Any motor vehicle accident has the potential to cause serious damage and injuries for victims. However, these crashes can be much more severe and complicated when one of the vehicles involved is a commercial-sized truck. Due to the size of these vehicles, they take longer to stop and can easily crush smaller vehicles upon impact. 

Because of how large and powerful they are, 18-wheelers are required to be operated and maintained in accordance with state and federal laws that may not necessarily apply to other vehicles. If there are any violations that contribute to a crash, a trucker or trucking company can ultimately be held liable for any damages. Many drivers in Atlanta may not be familiar with some of the more common violations that can cause an accident, but it can be very helpful to understand what these are.

In general, there are two different sources of violations: the truck and the driver.

A truck needs to be properly maintained for it to run safely. The wear and tear on a truck can be significant, considering the number of miles that these trucks travel every day. If a truck is neglected, it can break down or malfunction on the road, causing a serious accident. That is why it is crucial for equipment to be regularly checked, particularly these areas:

  • Tires
  • Brakes
  • Lighting

Drivers are also the cause of many accidents. They get drowsy, distracted or reckless behind the wheel, and some are not properly certified to operate a commercial vehicle. If any of the following violations are identified after a crash, a trucker may be held liable:

  • Limited English ability
  • Falsified log books
  • Vulnerable medical conditions

Understanding some of the most common violations that lead to a truck accident can be helpful to victims who have been injured. They can each be grounds for taking legal action against a truck driver or company. Filing a negligence claim can help victims and their families collect the compensation they need and deserve in order to recover from a crash.

Source: Truckinginfo, “How to avoid 6 common CSA violations,” Daren Hansen, May 13, 2014