We’ve previously discussed in this blog car and truck accidents in which those impacted suffered serious or even fatal injuries. Thankfully, the majority of car accidents are not deemed serious and do not result in those drivers and passengers impacted suffering the types of injuries that are considered to be life-threatening. Even seemingly minor injuries, however, are often painful and can adversely impact an individual’s ability to perform everyday tasks.

In the wake of a car accident, most drivers and passengers remain in a sort of daze as they attempt to make sense of what has happened. Oftentimes, car accidents occur so quickly that those directly impacted are not able to take evasive action or prepare in any way. This element of surprise can result in an individual’s muscles tensing up all at once which can cause extreme discomfort and soreness for days.

In cases where a driver or passenger hits a steering wheel, dashboard or airbag; they are likely to suffer bruising or even broken bones. An individual’s head and chest are typically the main point of impact when propelled forward. What may seem like a painful bruise or bump could actually be a much more serious bone break or concussion. It’s wise, therefore, that any individual involved in a car accident seek medical attention.

Upon visiting a doctor after a car accident, he or she will likely perform a series of tests to determine whether an individual suffered any more serious injuries such as ligament tears or broken bones. Additionally, areas of the body that show signs of bruising may be indicative of more serious internal injuries.

In cases where a truck or car accident resulted due to the negligent acts of another driver, individuals may want to consider taking legal action. In many cases, a personal injury lawsuit is an appropriate means to recovering compensation related to injuries, medical expenses and lost wages.

Source: Atlanta Magazine, “Walking away from a car crash: What can happen to the body in an automobile collision,” Christine Van Dusen, Oct. 9, 2013